Cyclone Motor Performance Testing
360 Watt Motor - 20" Folding Bike

Bike:
  Model: Downtube VIII FS
  Source: E-bay
  Price: Approx. $250
  Tire Size: 20"
  Tire Pressure: 65psi
  Cassette: 8 speed, 11-28
  Bike Weight w/ Batteries: 76 lbs
  Rider Weight: 220 lbs
  Gross Weight: 296 lbs
Motor Kit:
  Model: Cyclone 360 Watt
  Chainwheel: 44 Tooth
  Optional Watt Meter: Watt's-Up
Battery Pack:
  Type: NiMH
  Capacity: 2ea. - 24 Volt 13Ahr (24v 26Ahr total)
Trip Description:
  Location: Santa Ana River Trail, Orange County, CA
  Elevation: 50' Above sea level average
  Terrain: Level, asphalt bikeway
  Weather: Sunny, Wind 1mph, 71°F
Trip Start Readings:
  Voltage: 27.21
  Amps: 0
  Watts: 0
  V-min: 27.04
  A-max: 0.07
  W-max: 0
  AmpHours: 0
  WattHours: 0
  Battery Temp: 70°F
  Motor Temp: 71°F
  Top Speed: -
  Avg. Speed: -
  Total Distance: 0
Trip End Readings:
  Voltage: 22.41
  Amps: 0
  Watts: 0
  V-min: 16.61
  A-max: 31
  W-max: 726.5
  AmpHours: 42.411
  WattHours: 575
  Battery Temp: 79°F
  Motor Temp: 89°F
  Top Speed: 21.1mph
  Avg. Speed: 13.9mph
  Total Distance: 36.29 miles
Calculated Values:
  WattHours/Mile: 15.84
  Miles/KWh: 63.11
  Voltage Drop: 4.63
  Actual Whrs vs Rated Whrs: 575 vs 624 = 92.15%
  Actual Ahrs vs Rated Ahrs: 24.411 vs 26 = 93.9%
Trip Log:
I wanted to see what would happen if I hooked up two of the 13Ahr NiMH batteries in parallel so that I would have 24 volts at 26 AmpHours available. For this test I ran under motor power only and pedaled along only when absolutely necessary on the steepest hills and when passing other bikes at over 20mph.

The 2 NiMH batteries fit neatly into my rear rack bag on the Downtube 20" folding bike. I made a special wiring harness that allowed me to plug both batteries in at the same time in parallel. It is VERY important when doing this kind of setup that both batteries be fully charged when starting out. If they are not equally charged, current will flow from one battery into the other essentially "charging" it at a very high amperage - much more than the batteries are designed to handle under charge. If both batteries are equally charged, this effect is pretty much eliminated.

The bike's top speed was about the same as achieved in tests with a single NiMH battery. Climbing and acceleration were also very similar to the tests with a single battery. The big difference was that this double-battery combination was able to achieve over 36 miles without pedaling! I'm certain that if you pedaled along, the range could easily be extended to 45 miles or more.

As with the other tests of the 360w motor, we set our cruising speed at about 14-15mph which places the current drain at around 10 amps and the wattage draw at around 250w. We cruised most of the time in 4th or 5th gear. Our orange indicator LED came on at about the 24 mile mark and we went to a red LED at mile 30. We then reduced speed to 10-12mph and continued on to the 36.29 mile point where the controller cut off at approx. 16.5 volts.

Conclusions:
Using two NiMH batteries seems to be a good combination. While the total battery pack weighs in at about 21 lbs, the NiMH batteries put out lots of current to keep the 360w motor happy on acceleration and climbing. The best part of this setup is that completely discharged NiMH batteries will fully recharge in just 4.5 hours and be ready for another 36+ mile trip.
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